NEW RELEASE OF THE WEEK: NORAH JONES AND DANGER MOUSE TEAM UP FOR A 'SERIOUS INDIE POP ALBUM'

BUY THE CD HERE
BUY THE VINYL HERE
FREE GIFT WITH PURCHASE!

After the runaway train that was 2002′s Come Away With Me, Norah Jones had enough cache to pretty much do whatever she wanted. The diamond RIAA-rated coffee house jazz album came out of nowhere (a surprise considering her lineage) to top best of the year lists, also winning eight Grammys and many a mom’s heart as they stopped in to Starbucks on the way to pick up the kids from soccer practice. This instant freedom and carte blanche led to a vast array of projects, including a collaboration album featuring Q-Tip and Dolly Parton, forming roots country group The Little Willies, and working with Daniel Luppi and Danger Mouse on their expansive Rome. That last project must have had some serious mojo, as Jones brought the Mouse (aka Brian Burton) along to produce her new solo disc, Little Broken Hearts, her first since 2009′s The Fall.

Burton is one of the world’s biggest producers, and it’s no surprise that his diverse, singular set of sounds shapes Jones’ style in a new way. That smoky, lithe, gorgeous voice is still the same, the focal point that it deserves to be. That said, anyone still stuck on “Don’t Know Why” is a few steps back in Jones’ experimentation as an artist. She’s no longer anchored to the piano, and Little Broken Hearts steps out into a range that includes fuzzy guitars, string sections, and tinkling pop synthesizers. The two collaborators work together seamlessly, Jones smart enough to work with Burton’s envelope-pushing, and Burton smart enough to work to Jones’ vocal strengths.

This is a serious indie pop album. Jones and Burton have created something that should fit in the record collection of any Feist-loving indie kid just as easily as that of those soccer moms she won over years ago. Whether Little Broken Hearts actually finds that mass appeal or winds up frustrating both halves remains to be seen. It definitely walks a fine line between the two worlds, perhaps not edgy or different enough for indie pop, and too weird for the coffeehouse. But the songwriting, vocals, and clever production are undeniable, and the pairing just works, back on Rome and here as well. Only good things could come from Burton and Jones working together again in the future, perhaps pushing that envelope even further and finding an even more unique power.Consequence of Sound

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *